Campingaz CV 270 Plus Gas cartridge

My Campingaz Lumostar® Plus PZ lamp and Twister® Plus PZ stove take either 230g or 450g gas cartridges. My Campingaz gear gave me loads of great service, however, I eventually bit the bullet and bought an MSR WhisperLite stove which has numerous advantages over the gas canister-type stoves.

Campingaz CV270 Plus gas cartridge
Campingaz CV270 Plus gas cartridge

These are the re-fill cartridges for my Campingaz lamp and stove units. These cartridges were generally readily available — you could even find them at your local Pick’n’Pay. Lately, I have found them fairly scarce, and have had to ask Sportsmans Warehouse to order them in for me (they didn’t seem at all embarrassed by the fact that they stocked the fittings, but not the canisters).

The valve system allows you to attach and detach your fittings even once the canister has been in use (as opposed to similar systems where you actually have to pierce the canister), meaning you can easily stow your gear.

The cylinders are mixed with a mix of  butane and propane:

  1. Ultimately, the gases are quite similar, and the choice between the two largely depends on the availability and intended use of the product.
  2. Butane burns more cleanly and provides more energy, but propane is a better choice for situations in which temperatures may drop below freezing.
  3. Propane and butane are both combustible fuels derived from petroleum. As both fuels must be in a gaseous state before they can burn. and standard butane boils at 0°C, while propane boils at -42°C,  this means that if you are cooking in freezing weather, butane will not work well because it will remain in a liquid state.
  4. One of the advantages of butane is its improved fuel efficiency. If similar volumes of both substances are burned at temperatures above freezing, butane will provide about 12% more energy.
  5. Propane and butane are often combined in mixed fuels, which provide some of the advantages of each. Such mixes are popular for camping stoves in particular. Because propane has a lower boiling point, it can be used to force the butane out of the container, even at temperatures at or below freezing. Pure propane needs a strong steel container to hold it under pressure; combining it with butane means that the pressure can be lower, and the container lighter, which is important for campers and backpackers.*
  6. Altitude offsets the effect of cold temperatures. The lower atmospheric pressure (with higher altitude) makes it easier for the liquid fuel to vaporize in the canister and supply the burner with gas.**

230g Cartridge
R49.99 @ Checkers Hype
R64.95 @ Sportsmans Warehouse
R64.95 @ Outdoor Warehouse

450g Cartridge
R69.99 @ Pick ‘n’ Pay
R74.95 @ Sportsmans Warehouse
R74.95 @ Outdoor Warehouse

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-the-difference-between-propane-and-butane.htm
** http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/canister_stove_faq#.UXkw-LVkN8E

David

Outdoor adventure enthusiast living on the Garden Route.

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